TE Morning News - 2/12/18 
  • The Lady Cougars played their game this season last Friday falling to the Illing Rams, 26-22.  The Lady Cougars were led by Lexie Wheeler with a game high 12 points.  Maria Galley added seven, while Anna Matus hit a three pointer to round out the scoring.  It was the last game for the 8th graders as well.  Coach Chandler would like to thank the two captains, Lexie and Maria as well as the remaining 8th graders, Bridget Doherty, Carly Pitruzzello, Ella Suppicich, Haydin Courtois, and Anna Kim for their hard work and dedication throughout the season.  The Lady Cougars finished their season 5 and 7, with wins against Ellington, Tolland (twice) and JFK (twice).  Great job ladies.

  • We have our TEMS shirts, caps and winter hats.  To make the look complete we need TEMS Socks!  Yes, that's right SOCKS!!  Order your TEMS socks today.  You can order grey and purple or white and purple.  Socks are of great quality and complete with our cougar emblem.  Socks are $12.00 a pair, order forms are in the main office. 

  • Grade 6 Ambassadors, you have a meeting today in the upper section of the school library.  Please bring your lunch to the meeting.  Your homeroom teacher has a pass for you for this meeting.

  • Attention Baseball Players – there will be a mandatory, informational baseball meeting on Tuesday, February 20th for those interested in trying out for the Timothy Edwards Middle School Baseball Team.  The meeting will take place in room 313 immediately after school and end at 3:30.  Plan on getting picked up at 3:30 PM. Please pick up a permission form in room 313. 
  • Attention any 8th grade students interested in auditioning for the South Windsor High School Show Choir, Choral Spectrum:  On-line information and registration are now available.  See Mrs. Gasta as soon as possible for the Google Classroom Code.

  • Good morning. My name is Olivia  and I'm reporting for Sage Team student Kayla Cyr who chose to recognize Rosa Parks as her honorary pick for Black History month.

Rosa Parks was born on February 4, 1913 in Tuskegee, Alabama and she became a civil rights activist who is best known for her role in the Montgomery Bus Boycott. 

She attended the Montgomery Industrial School for Girls and then Alabama State Teacher's College in order to try and get her high school diploma. Unfortunately, Rosa's education was cut short when her mother became very ill. Rosa left school to care for her mother. A few years later, Rosa met her husband, Raymond Parks, a successful barber. 

Rosa worked part time jobs and went back to school, finally earning her high school diploma. During this time, the city of Montgomery was segregated. This meant that things were different for white people and black people. They had different schools, different churches, different stores, different elevators, and even different drinking fountains. Places often had signs saying: "For Colored Only" or "For Whites Only". When Rosa would ride the bus to work, she would have to sit in the back in the seats marked "for colored". Sometimes she would have to stand even if there were seats open up front. 

Growing up, Rosa had lived with racism in the south. She was scared of the members of the KKK who had burned down black school houses and churches. She also saw a black man get beaten by a white bus driver for getting in his way. Rosa and her husband Raymond wanted to do something about it. They joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). 

On December 1, 1955, Rosa made her famous stand (while sitting) on the bus. Rosa had settled in her seat on the bus after a hard day's work. All the seats on the bus had filled up when a white man boarded. The bus driver told Rosa and some other African-Americans to stand up. Rosa refused. The bus driver said he would call the police. Rosa didn't move and was arrested and charged with breaking a segregation law. She refused to pay her fine of $10, however, saying that she was not guilty and that the law was illegal. She appealed to a higher court. That night a number of African-American leaders got together and decided to boycott the city buses. This meant that African-Americans would no longer ride the buses. One of these leaders was Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr..

It wasn't easy for people to boycott the buses as many African-Americans didn't have cars. They had to walk to work or get a ride in a carpool. Many people couldn't go into town to buy things. However, they stuck together in order to make a statement. The boycott continued for 381 days! Finally, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the segregation laws in Alabama were unconstitutional. 

Just because the laws were changed, things didn't get any easier for Rosa. She received many threats and feared for her life. Many of the civil rights leader's houses were bombed, including the home of Martin Luther King Jr.

In 1957, Rosa and Raymond moved to Detroit, Michigan where she continued to attend civil rights meetings. She died on October 24, 2005 but she was a symbol to many African-Americans of the fight for equal rights and is still a symbol of freedom and equality to many today. Rosa Parks was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal as well as the Presidential Medal of Freedom. 

  • Today for lunch... In the Create line you can have Orange Glazed Chicken. In the Grill line you can have Meatball Sub and in the On the Go line you can have your choice of deli sandwiches. Have a great day, do your best, and remember to always strive for 5!



Posted by dmatchett On 12 February, 2018 at 2:44 PM  

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